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Two Treatises of Government



TWO
TREATISES
OF
GOVERNMENT


BY
JOHN LOCKE

In the Former,
The False Principles, and Foundation
OF
Sir ROBERT FILMER,
And his Followers,
ARE
Detected and Overthrown.

The Latter Is an
ESSAY
CONCERNING THE
True Original, Extent, and End
OF
Civil Government.



BOOK I: The First Treatise of Government: The False Principles and Foundations of Sir Robert Filmer, and His Followers, are Detected and Overthrown

BOOK II: The Second Treatise of Government: An Essay Concerning the True Origin, Extent, and End of Civil Government

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